Fish and Run

Ceviche

Rachel Allen -yes, she of the perma grin, grating accent and stylish clothes-introduced me to this delightful dish last week. As she promises on the RTE website it`s a zingy, refreshing dish, and, as I discovered, perfect recovery fuel for my long runs.

The interesting thing about Ceviche is that the fish is `cooked` in lime juice. That`s it. No pan, no oven, nada. Just marinate for a couple of hours and the acid in the juice will cook the flesh.

You can use any white fish. I used haddock. It didn`t slice up as neatly as Rachel`s. But then, I`m not Rachel. And I differed in the amount of certain ingredients, preferring 1/2 a chilli to one whole one, and adding coriander because I am particularly fond of it with avocado.

Anyway, be sure to see Rachel`s pic. And I`ve copied her recipe here.

Ceviche

500 g skinless white fish fillets (such as pollock, haddock, cod, plaice or sole, cut into strips 5mm thick)
juice of 6 limes
3 spring onions (trimmed and sliced)
150 g cucumber (peeled and cut into 5mm dice)
2 avocados (peeled, stone removed and flesh cut into 5mm dice)
1 red chilli (deseeded and finely chopped)
lime slices, to serve

Method
1.Place the fish pieces in a large bowl, add the lime juice and mix together, then cover with cling film or a plate and leave in the fridge to chill for at least 1 hour.
2.Remove from the fridge and mix in the remaining ingredients. Divide between plates, add lime slices and serve.

I loved this dish. I`ll confess I let it marinate in the fridge for three hours. Just being a little nervous about the lime juice cooking process and wanted to ensure the fish was well-cooked. Next time I`m going to marinate it with more of the other ingredients just to allow for a greater fusion of flavours.

Beach run

Beach run

This morning`s beach run peaked my interest in some fishy lunch. I rarely run before breakfast but the configuration of today`s activities meant I either took my chance early this morning, or forget about it. I am curious about the whole carb fuelling thing anyway. I have a theory that if we get used to running hungry we might cope with the glycogen crash that hits in marathons. In the weeks prior to last October`s marathon I deliberately stretched the time between meals just to get used to that hungry feeling.

But enough about my crazy running theories. Had a really nice beach run, of just four miles. Perfect conditions, warm sun, cool breeze, empty beach and all done before breakfast.

With a run done before breakfast, and a perfectly fishy lunch, it`s been one of my better Juneathon days.

How was yours?